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Major Douglas and Alberta Social Credit

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Published by University of Toronto Press in Toronto, Buffalo .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Alberta

Subjects:

  • Douglas, C. H. 1879-1952 -- Influence.,
  • Alberta Social Credit Party -- History.,
  • Alberta Social Credit Party -- Histoire.,
  • Social credit -- Alberta -- History -- 20th century.,
  • Crédit social -- Alberta -- Histoire.,
  • Alberta -- Politics and government -- 1921-1935.,
  • Alberta -- Politics and government -- 1935-1971.,
  • Alberta -- Politics and government -- 1921-1935.,
  • Alberta -- Politics and government -- 1935-1971.,
  • Alberta -- Politique et gouvernement -- 1921-1935.,
  • Alberta -- Politique et gouvernement -- 1935-1971.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [241]-305) and index.

StatementBob Hesketh.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF1078 .H47 1997
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 315 p. ;
Number of Pages315
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL317172M
ISBN 100802041485, 0802079946
LC Control Number97229053
OCLC/WorldCa36692240

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The Alberta Social Credit Party was a provincial political party in Alberta, Canada, that was founded on social credit monetary policy put forward by Clifford Hugh Douglas and on conservative Christian social values. The Canadian social credit movement was largely an out-growth of the Alberta Social Credit Party. The Social Credit Party of Canada was strongest in Alberta, before developing a Ideology: Christian right, Social credit (historical). Major Douglas and Alberta Social Credit by Bob Hesketh (Book) Understanding the financial system: social credit re-discovered by Frances Hutchinson (Book) Purchasing power and trade depression, a critique of underconsumption theories by E. F. M Durbin.   The role of anti-Semitism in Social Credit theory has long been recognized. C. B. Macpherson's Democracy in Alberta, the classic account of the rise of Social Credit in Alberta, documented the fanatic anti-Semitism of Major C. H. Douglas, the founder of Social Credit doctrine. ‘Social Credit’ being the name which is typically given to that coherent and cogent body of thought on social matters that was first developed in the early decades of the twentieth century by the brilliant Anglo-Scottish engineer, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas.

The Douglas System of Social Credit; Evidence Taken by the Agricultural Committee of the Alberta Legislature, Session by Social Credit and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The founder of Social Credit, C.H. Douglas, presented this idea as early as Keynes actually referred somewhat favorably to Douglas's basic idea in the General Theory. The Social Credit movement still exists in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and its ideas are still used to defend the creation of a State controlled fiat money system. Social Credit Movement synonyms, Social Credit Movement pronunciation, Social Credit Movement translation, English dictionary definition of Social Credit Movement. n a right-wing populist political party, movement, or doctrine based on the socioeconomic theories of . Douglas, C. H. and Douglas Social Credit Association (N.S.W.). Major C.H. Douglas speaks Douglas Social Credit Association Sydney Australian/Harvard Citation.

Social Crediter synonyms, Social Crediter pronunciation, Social Crediter translation, English dictionary definition of Social Crediter. n a right-wing populist political party, movement, or doctrine based on the socioeconomic theories of Major C. H. Douglas; the federal party in Canada was. Aberhart established the Alberta Social Credit League in the belief that Major Douglas had located the source behind an inherent deficiency of purchasing power in the economy. Social Credit as a particular brand of reform thinking in the s has to be situated in an English-speaking avant-gardeAuthor: Victor Short. It was widely said that it marked the final abandonment of social credit principles as well as practice." (9) Offering a broader perspective on the purge's effects, Walter Young states that by the s, "[t]here were some who still believed fervently in Douglasite social credit doctrine- . For years scholars have maintained that Social Credit was a protest on the part of small-scale farmers, who fought against their disadvantaged position in advanced capitalism by rejecting central Canada's control of the prairie region. The protest is usually described as conservative and its supporters portrayed as small agrarian capitalists who combined their opposition to regional.